Photography Tips for Spring

Spring has sprung, and while some enjoy documenting the dark, mysterious scenes of winter, many amateur photographers feel more confident in the bright, colorful, sunny days of spring and summer. Whether you are snapping photos with your phone or working with professional equipment, expert advice can always come in handy.

One great tip for photography anywhere is the rule of thirds. Many amateur photographers place the subject of their image directly in the center- an approach that is relatively easy but rarely creates the depth and personality that a photograph can express. Instead, try the rule of thirds by imagining a tic-tac-toe grid over your image. The four points where the lines intersect are called “points of power” by photographers, because they lend depth, interest and definition to a finished photograph. Place the focal points of your images on one of these intersections points to give your final products an immediate touch-up.

Another great way to add drama to your photographs is by filling the entire frame with your subject. Take this image by Chris Gamel, for example:

Elephant Close-Up: Thomson Safaris

The elephant’s face takes up the entire image, and in doing so allows the viewer to connect with both the subject and the photographer behind it. Gamel explains: “As she approached, I asked myself what it was that captured my interest. The answer was obvious- an elephant was walking directly towards me… The result is an image with impact that reflects my personal experience.”

Gamel suggests: “Ask yourself what you are taking a picture of. The fewer words you use to answer that question, the better. Once you have identified your subject, fill the image frame with it. Usually, this means getting closer. Fascinated by the dexterity of a local artist’s hands- get closer. Want to capture the look of joy on your child’s face just before she zip-lines through the rainforest- get closer.”

About

James Fishman has been involved in the world of online magazines for more than 15 years. He helped launch Sunstone Online and continues to improve the magazine as site editor and administrator. His writing focuses primarily business and technology. To be in touch with James, feel free to contact him at james[at]sunstoneonline.com.

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