Choosing the Right Phone


All students need a good cellphone these days.  In fact, pretty much most people require such mobility for their everyday lives in today’s modern world.  But what is a student supposed to look for in terms of features?  First, since most students are on quite a budget (or at least should be), a pay as you go plan is a good idea.  In this same vein, ensure that any unused minutes for the month can be “rolled over” to the next month.  You might also want to get a phone with at least a 3 megapixel (relatively good quality) camera to capture all those not-to-be-forgotten student memories; the first time you went to the student bar; your first lecture hall; even your first college date.  Next, since students are often attempting to be great social butterflies, look for a phone featuring one click access to Facebook and Twitter so that all your followers know exactly what you’re doing and where, any time of day or night.  Check out the different prices of phones offering these features and you’ll be well on your way to a great cellphone purchase.

Science Museums are More for Fun Than for Learning

I was just at the Science Museum with my kids the other day. Even though it’s noisy and crowded the kids still seemed to have a lot of fun. They had fun for the simple reason that they could touch just about everything in sight. There were so many levers, buttons and things that make noise to keep them busy for hours, and all in pursuit of knowledge. Remembering my own experiences as a child in similar places, I always doubt the actual educational benefits of exhibits that show that, when you press this button, that thing over there lights up. All the child knows is that, “Wow, I pressed a button and the light lit up.” It’s up to the mom to actually explain that, “The reason the light comes on is because there is a magnet which turns on when you press this button and then off when you press another, making an alternating current…” and on and on, and when Mom looks up from reading the explanation she discovers that she has been reading to the thin air, and on top of that, the two year old twins are nowhere to be found! Help!

Not to worry. I found the twins. They were stuffing small plastic leaves into the bottom of a tube which had air blowing upwards, which carried the little leaves high up and out of the tube, until they fluttered back down to earth again. It was really fun to watch, but the science of wind propelled objects and the physics of aviation I am afraid was lost on their cute little minds. And the older kids were long gone, running all over the place, pushing and pressing, but never stopping too long to wonder. I wonder where “wonder” happens.  Maybe at home, on a quiet walk in the park, or at night while looking at the stars.

Maintaining Healthy Calcium Levels


As a student, it’s so easy to forget to eat properly.  But for optimum health, it’s so important.  What’s good to look at (even at a relatively young age) is your family history.  If you have a mother and grandmother for example who suffered from osteoporosis then you want to keep your calcium levels elevated.  Even if you have no symptoms of brittle bones or problem teeth, chances are, as you age, you will.  So in this case, you can enrich your diet with calcium in a relatively easy way.  Good sources of the mineral include: dairy produce, tahini, sesame seeds, spinach, broccoli.  No matter what your taste buds enjoy, there are dozens of recipes on the Internet these days that will tempt them somehow.  Taking a calcium supplement isn’t a bad idea either, but do not think it is in place of the calcium-enriched diet.  Take notes from a proper physician on what the best supplement would be. You can even do an early detection test for osteoporosis if it is in your family, but the best thing to do is take preventive measures, like adding it to your diet earlier rather than later.

Say ‘I Love You’ With Lasagna

I love lasagna, as do all the members of my family. My children expect it as their special dinner on their birthdays, and when we want to celebrate just about anything, lasagna is the main dish of choice. We all know about this wonderful pasta dish, but really, do we know the true essence of Garfield’s obsession?

What I believe is truly great about lasagna is how easy it is to make it, and how many variations there are on the theme. Lasagna can truly be made as a reflection of the inner self. A more health conscious mom might add some green vegies like broccoli or zucchini. My personal favorite is spinach. It is possible to mix in meat, but not necessary if you are a vegetarian. You can use lots of yummy pasta sauce, homemade or from a jar, or you can make it less tomato-y and more cheese-y, if you aren’t too worried about counting the calories in this slightly “heavy on the fat” lactose-intolerant person’s nightmare. And if that does happen to be the case, you can use cottage cheese instead of ricotta, no parmesan cheese, and go easy on the mozzarella.  In short, lasagna is almost anything you want it to be. It is therefore truly you.

Giving Of Your Time

There is so much to learn when you are in college.  Of course, there is the academic side that you signed up for but there is also much in terms of life lessons.  One really needs to make the most of all the opportunities that are there for them.  One good thing to do – especially for those people who enjoy animals – is to volunteer with the elderly using an animal.  So often the elderly are incredibly lonely but it is difficult for strangers to just come and talk to them.  If you take a dog with you however, then you break the ice easily and you may enjoy the visit more too.  Sometimes it can even be advisable to take a more senior dog along with you; that way it won’t be so feisty and the elderly individual can feel an affinity with them.  A friendly, licking dog can really make an old person feel good.  There are no judgments, no questions, no “why don’t you do anything all day?”  All dogs want to do is give love.  And students have the opportunity and often the time to take these loving pets to the homes of the elderly in the community.  It’s just a great way to give back.

Staying Healthy While Feeding Your Furry Friend

While you love your dog or cat, you may not realize that your animal’s food may actually be causing health risks for your child.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention explain that salmonella bacteria in dried dog and cat food sparked an outbreak of salmonella infections between 2006 and 2008.

The CDC investigators, in their report in Pediatrics, explained that the connection did not come from children actually eating the pet food.  More likely, it came from bugs that spread by direct contact with the pets.  Infection, they found, was certainly more likely if pet bowls were kept in the kitchen.

Certainly, pet owners should wash their hands after feeding pets or handling pet food.  Move pet food out of the kitchen or clean your floors frequently.  Wash your hands after playing with your animal and avoid flea and tick-control products that have organophosphate pesticides in them.