17 ½ Hour Old Has Open Heart Surgery

The youngest baby to ever have open heart surgery was a mere 17-and-a-half hours old. The surgery took place a few months ago at Freeman Hospital in Newcastle, UK where parents Jo and James were warned their newborn baby daughter only had a 15 percent chance of survival. Beating the odds however, it now appears baby Jasmine Carr will be home by April 2012.

Baby Jasmine needed the surgery as, at a 20-week scan, it was found that she had hypoplastic left heart syndrome.  This is when one side of the heart doesn’t develop properly, so, at 37 weeks, they induced labor and Jasmine weighed in at 5 lb 13 oz with a heart that was only the size of a walnut.  During the 11-hour surgery, Dr. Asif Hasan re-plumbed the heart so that the right side could do the work of the left.  The day after, Jasmine suffered a cardiac arrest and for three months thereafter, was confined to intensive care.  But then, in mid-December, she moved to a high dependency ward and now doctors are confident she will make a complete recovery.

She has now undergone further surgery in order to widen an artery.  In the next few months, it is hoped – and expected – she will be able to go home.  Jasmine breaks records since the youngest baby before her to undergo this surgery was 36-hour-old Rudy Maxwell-Jones who was operated on in July 2011.

Staying Disciplined to Exercise: Tips for the Trade

runningSometimes, staying fit is all about your mental space. Gaining encouragement from others who are dedicating themselves to exercising regularly can give you the boost you need to keep going. On a recent blog post, Lindsey Holder offered such inspiration when she interviewed the extremely busy executive Jim Donovan. Goldman Sachs executive and adjunct professor at the University of Virginia School of Law, Jim Donovan still makes time for running in his life.

When she asked Donovan what made him start running, he replied that he started running as an outlet when beginning with Goldman Sachs. Explaining why running was such a great outlet for him, James Donovan, a Goldman Sachs Managing Director, said, “I then made certain that I ran for 30-45 minutes every day no matter what.  No matter how little I slept and no matter where in the world I happened to be, all I needed was a pair of sneakers and running clothes to start my day. I’ve been a convert ever since.”

When asked if he incorporates other activities into his weekly exercise program, Donovan said,

“I have incorporated a 30-40 minute pushup/jumpie workout once or twice into my week instead of a run.  This workout is basically designed to generate the same feeling that is created during my run, though.  It is very fast and very difficult.”

Certainly, for many of us who are less busy than Jim Donovan, Goldman Sachs executive, we can probably learn a few things about discipline and hard work from a role model of this sort.

Coffee and Type 2 Diabetes

Research has found that those who drink a lot of coffee have a reduced risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.  According to a report in the ACS’ Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry compiled by Kun Huang, Ling Zheng et. al, those who drink at least four cups of coffee per day have a 50 percent lower risk of developing this debilitating disease (which accounts for up to 95 percent of cases of diabetes).  Perhaps even more interesting, each additional Cuppa Joe that is consumed per day brings with it a further 7 percent of reduced chance of being afflicted with Type 2 diabetes.

Coffee Composition

So what is it in coffee that is causing this preventive health benefit?  According to the study, it appears that one of the substances in the beverage is a potential hIAPP blocker.  hIAPP – human islet amyloid polypeptide – could be able to be blocked by a substance contained in coffee.  The researchers have identified two categories of compounds contained in coffee that “significantly inhibit hIAPP.”

So keep the dark brown granules in your cup and throw over that boiling water without any guilt of coffee being bad for you.