That Book Club Might Save Your Life

library-108544_960_720Interestingly, it might be more important for you to chat about your latest book than to get your body moving, say researchers looking at retirement needs. Scientists have found that maintaining social links in old age may help you to live longer.

Tracking a group of 424 English men and women during their first six years of retirement, the scientists found a six-fold difference in mortality rates between the people who were members of at least two social groups from before their retirement and those who stopped attending clubs. The researchers, from the University of Queensland in Australia published their findings in BMJ Open, a UK medical journal.

As they explained, “Retiring from work constitutes a major life transition that most people experience at some point in the course of their life, posing significant challenges to health and wellbeing.”

They found that the number of social relationships that people maintain during their retirement can have more of an impact on life expectancy than exercise, smoking or drinking.

The overall take-away, as explained by the researchers was that: “Practical interventions should focus on helping retirees to maintain their sense of purpose and belonging by assisting them to connect to groups and communities that are meaningful to them.”

About

James Fishman has been involved in the world of online magazines for more than 15 years. He helped launch Sunstone Online and continues to improve the magazine as site editor and administrator. His writing focuses primarily business and technology. To be in touch with James, feel free to contact him at james[at]sunstoneonline.com.

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