Metropolitan Museum of Art Launches ‘Cloud City’ Exhibit

Cloud City

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is launching a new 6-month exhibit today called “Cloud City.” Mixing art, architecture and science, the ‘city’ provides a new perspective on the New York from the museum’s rooftop garden.

The exhibit is 54 feet long and 28 feet high, made from large, seemingly unorganized units of various reflective materials, such as glass and mirrors. Central Park and New York’s skyline provide the backdrop for the unique installation. Tomas Saraceno, the Argentine artist who created the experience, explains that the spheres create a dimension that removes you from where you really are.

“Upside down, Central Park is a flying garden embedded in a cumulus cloud, mirrored buildings and skies appear under your feet, gravity seems to reorient itself, and people are multiplied in patchworks of cloudscape, forming unexpected interconnected networks,” Saraceno said.

The museum and artist have been working on the exhibit for two years. According to Anne Strauss of the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art, the creation was “a bold and exhilarating endeavor.”

She continued, “Thomas Saraceno is an artist who opens our eyes to ideas and possibilities and his site-specific structure is so successfully in dialogue with the setting. It is a microcosm against the microcosm that is Manhattan.”

Saraceno added, “Cloud City is an invitation to perceive simultaneously a multiplicity of realities, making overlapping and multi-reflective connections between things, affecting and challenging our perceptions.

“Cloud City is a vehicle for our imagination, ready to transport us beyond social, political and geographical states of mind.”